viewbarcode.com

Table 3.1. Personality traits and intensity of motivation in .NET Development bar code 39 in .NET Table 3.1. Personality traits and intensity of motivation




How to generate, print barcode using .NET, Java sdk library control with example project source code free download:
38 Table 3.1. Personality traits and intensity of motivation using barcode creator for .net control to generate, create 39 barcode image in .net applications. Use Mobile Phone to Scan 1D and 2D Barcodes Basic desire Acceptance VS .NET Code 3/9 Curiosity Eating Familya Honor Idealism Independence Order Physical Activity Power Romance Saving Social Contact Status Tranquility Vengeance. The Normal Personality Insuf cient motivation Low-Intensity motivation Average High-Intensity E .net framework barcode 39 xcessive motivation motivation motivation No trait No trait No trait No trait No trait No trait No trait No trait No trait No trait No trait No trait No trait No trait No trait No trait Insecure Intellectual Overweight Responsible Trustworthy Humanitarian Self-reliant Organized Energetic Ambitious Romantic Frugal Friendly Formal Cautious Warrior Self-abasing Overly analytical Obese Doting Righteous True believer Stubborn Perfectionist Exhausting Controlling Oversexed Miserly Buffoonery Snob Coward Mean, brutal. Overcon dent Self-con de nt Mindless Practical Malnourished Abusive Unethical Unjust, unfair Dependent Chaotic Inactive Submissive Abstinent Wasteful Boorishness Shabby Fearless Keeps peace Thin Noninvolved Expedient Uninvolved Interdependent Disorganized Lazy Laid-back Undersexed Spender Private Informal Risktaker Gentle, kind. Parenting style with a low-intensity bas ic desire for curiosity impress others as practical. People who have an average-intensity basic desire for curiosity make no distinctive impression on other people with regard to how curious they are. They may be curious about some, but not many, topics.

People who have a high-intensity basic desire for curiosity impress others as being intellectual, whereas those with excessive curiosity impress others as being overly analytical and living in an ivory tower. The remainder of Table 3.1 is read in a similar manner.

Each of the sixteen basic desires is a psychological need. Insuf cient (very weak), low (weak), high (strong), and excessive (very strong) intensities of each need theoretically produce the personality traits shown in the table. Average-intensity desires, however, create no distinctive impressions because the individual shows mixed traits from both the strong- and weak-intensity categories.

Intensity of motivation is central to understanding personality from a motivational standpoint, but it is virtually ignored in mainstream psychology and counseling. Your counselor or therapist, for example, tends to overlook intensity of motivation when teaching you self-understanding. Motivation analysis is.

Intensity of Basic Motivation one of the few theories of personality to recognize the importance of intensity of motivation. Reiss Motivation Pro le Everybody embraces all s ixteen basic desires, but at different intensities. The intensities with which an individual habitually experiences each of the sixteen basic desires are called a Reiss Motivation Pro le.1 The RMP shows the individual s rank ordering, or prioritization, of the sixteen basic desires.

Many personality traits can be understood in terms of the individual s RMP. Intensity of motivation is central for understanding personality functioning. For the sake of simplicity, three intensities of motivation will be called Strong, Average, and Weak.

Strong-Intensity Desires indicate a stronger-than-average need (upper 20 percent when compared with the general population). People develop habits, or personality traits, to satiate these desires repeatedly. Example: A person with a high-intensity need to think is motivated to spend so much time engaged in intellectual activities that he or she shows traits of an intellectual.

Weak-Intensity Desires indicate a weaker-than-average need (lower 20 percent when compared with the general population). People develop habits, called personality traits, to satiate these desires repeatedly. Example: A person with a low-intensity need to think is motivated to spend such little time engaged in intellectual activities that he or she will show traits of a practical, action-oriented person.

Average-Intensity Desires indicate an average need (includes 60 percent of the general population). These needs are satis ed by everyday life experiences and do not require distinctive habits or personality traits to gratify them. People with average-intensity desires sometimes show traits associated with strong-intensity desires and sometimes show traits associated with weakintensity desires.

The following comments show the theoretical connections between strong and weak basic desires and personality traits. The order of presentation is alphabetical. These descriptions are backed generally by peer-reviewed scienti c studies showing the validity of the RMP (see Table 2.

2); many speci c details, however, are still theoretical in nature and require empirical evaluations. The system as a whole has been used professionally in counseling and coaching with thousands of people; the feedback is uncommonly positive. All of the suggested connections between basic desires and personality traits are fully testable scienti cally using the RMP standardized instrument.

.
Copyright © viewbarcode.com . All rights reserved.