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The Language of Empire in .NET Creation data matrix barcodes in .NET The Language of Empire




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The Language of Empire use visual studio .net data matrix ecc200 implementation todisplay gs1 datamatrix barcode with .net Visual Studio 2005 he returns from C data matrix barcodes for .NET ilicia in 50, Cicero complains that the senate has left provinciae sine imperio ;67 and in the De provinciis consularibus in 56, he describes Macedonia in the same terms when speaking of a time when it was controlled through legates.68 Mommsen believed that sine imperio was a technical term for the temporary absence of an imperium-holder,69 but whether this be true or not it does seem that there was a notion of an ongoing entity which was still called a provincia when there was no speci c individual whose provincia it was.

Cicero in several places, when he is at pains to emphasise the history of Roman presence in an area, speaks of the provincia s passing from one magistrate to another in ways which demonstrate its continuity;70 and he mentions, among the forgeries of Caesar s proposals which Antonius perpetrated after the assassination of the dictator, a decree that Crete should no longer be a provincia after the tenure of M. Brutus as proconsul.71 There is another way in which by Cicero s time the meaning of provincia has enlarged from its root meaning of the responsibility of an imperium-holder.

Provinciae are sometimes referred to as belonging to the Roman people,72 and also as being our or your provinciae when addressing a court or the senate.73 This occasionally is expressed in even stronger language, with the provinciae appearing as the possessions or estates of the Roman people, and similar language is used of them as sources of income, especially vectigalia.74 The contrast between the provinciae seen as the possessions of the people as a whole and as the responsibilities of the holder of imperium is underlined by Cicero s other use of the phrase nostra provincia, in.

67 70. 71 73. Att. 7.7.

5. 68 Pr ov. cons.

5. 69 Mommsen, StR i.677 n.

3. Div. Caec.

13; 2 Verr. 1.16; 2.

3; 2.5; 2.6; 2.

7; 3.16; 3.125; 4.

1; Pis. 44; 61; Planc. 28; Scaur.

26; Lig. 2. Phil.

2.97. 72 2 Verr.

1.78; 3.49; 4.

67; 5.136; 5.163; Pis.

44; 87; Phil. 3.11.

2 Verr. 2.7; 3.

64; 4.25; 5.157; Leg.

Man. 5; Flac. 67; Prov.

cons. 31; Balb. 9; Lig.

24; Deiot. 36. Provinciae as possessions: 2 Verr.

2.7; Leg. agr.

3.15; as sources of vectigal: Leg. agr.

1.21; 2.82.

. Cicero s empire: imperium populi Romani his letters durin g his time in charge of Cilicia.75 However seriously he took his role with regard to our provincia at that time, there is no suggestion that he saw Cilicia as territory belonging to him. When the provinciae are spoken of as the people s, however, they are very close to being, in modern terminology, overseas possessions.

There is another use of the word provincia which relates neither to the responsibility of the imperium-holder, nor to the imperial holdings of the Roman state. Frequently Cicero uses the word to refer to the community of people who live in the area. At least 130 of the 673 passages (19.

32%) in which he uses provincia come into this category.76 The clearest and most dramatic examples are those in which the provincia is personi ed, either by making it the subject of an active verb77 or the agent in a sentence with a passive verb.78 In other passages the provincia is given eyes or the ability to praise and give thanks.

79 Such personi cations of provinciae are to be found. 75 76. Fam. 2.11.

2; Att. 5.13.

1; 5.17.5; 5.

21.2; 6.1.

2; 6.1.14.

Div. Caec. 3; 5; 7; 11; 14; 19; 21; 27; 37; 54 (twice); 63; 65; 1 Verr.

2; 2 Verr. 1.10; 1.

21; 1.35; 1.58; 1.

63; 1.76; 1.78; 1.

96; 2.1; 2.2 3; 2.

5; 2.11; 2.29; 2.

37; 2.81; 2.113; 2.

117; 2.118; 2.133; 2.

134; 2.135; 2.137; 2.

139; 2.149; 2.154; 2.

155; 2.160; 2.168; 2.

184; 3.21; 3.43; 3.

45; 3.48; 3.52; 3.

60; 3.64 (twice); 3.120; 3.

122; 3.124; 3.126; 3.

128; 3.129; 3.131; 3.

132; 3.137; 3.149; 3.

180; 3.186; 3.201; 3.

207; 3.213; 3.217; 3.

223; 3.224; 4.1; 4.

2; 4.8; 4.20; 4.

35; 4.42; 4.86; 4.

90; 4.105; 4.113; 4.

138; 4.142; 4.143; 4.

150; 5.29; 5.59; 5.

92; 5.94; 5.136 7; 5.

157; 5.168; 5.179; Or.

perd. 9 (Tog. Cand.

) fr. 8; fr. 24; Mur.

33; Or. perd. 14 (Clod.

) fr. 9/10; Q Fr. 1.

1.6; 1.1.

7; 1.1.13; 1.

1.15; 1.1.

17; 1.1.30; 1.

1.41; 1.2.

6; Flac. 8; 14; 100; fr. Med.

; Pis. 87; Fam. 7.

17.3; Planc. 100; Scaur.

24; 26; 35; Att. 5.16.

22; 5.20.6; Fam.

3.8.5; 3.

8.7; 3.8.

8; 15.14.3; Att.

6.1.2 (three times); Fam.

3.9.1; 3.

10.5; 3.10.

8; Parad. 6.46; Acad.

2.1; Phil. 3.

13; 5.24; 7.11.

For example: recepi enim causam Siciliae: ea me ad hoc negotium provincia attraxit (2 Verr. 2.1); hic ego, si hanc causam non omnium Siculorum rogatu recepissem, si hoc a me muneris non universa provincia poposcisset .

. . (2 Verr.

2.117); lugent omnes provinciae, queruntur omnes liberi populi, regna denique etiam omnia de nostris cupiditatibus et iniuriis expostulant (2 Verr. 3.

207); sed quid opus fuit eius modi litteris quas ad ipsum misisti illum crucem sibi ipsum constituere, ex qua tu eum ante detraxisses; te curaturum fumo ut combureretur plaudente tota provincia (Q Fr. 1.2.

6). For example: ergo ab universa provincia, generatimque a singulis eius partibus, non solum diligitur, sed etiam ornatur (2 Verr. 2.

168). For example: cum haec confessus eris, quae in foro palam Syracusis in ore atque in oculis provinciae gesta sunt, negato tum sane, si voles, te pecuniam accepisse (2 Verr. 2.

81); te de provincia decedentem summa laus et summa gratia provinciae prosecuta est (Fam. 15.14.

3)..
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